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Orlando Cohabitation Agreements Lawyer

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Orlando Cohabitation Agreements Lawyer

For couples in Orlando, FL, who are not interested in getting married, there are options for protecting yourselves and your property. A cohabitation agreement is a contract between two people who live together that outlines how assets will be divided in the event of a breakup and set out each person’s rights and responsibilities. 

They’re often used similarly to prenuptial or postnuptial agreements for couples who choose to marry. Cohabitation agreements protect both parties. The experienced Orlando cohabitation agreements lawyers with Conti Moore Law Divorce Lawyers, PLLC, can help you throughout the entire process. Contact our law office today for more information, or call (407) 831-0203 to schedule your free consultation today.

How Conti Moore Law Divorce Lawyers, PLLC, Can Help With Your Cohabitation Agreement in Orlando

How Conti Moore Law Divorce Lawyers, PLLC, Can Help With Your Cohabitation Agreement in Orlando

When you have legal questions, you need to get answers you can trust. One of the best ways to do that is to partner with a lawyer with decades of experience. 

At Conti Moore Law Divorce Lawyers, PLLC, we have many Orlando natives on our team, bringing an insider’s perspective to work with the local community, leveraging those relationships for your benefit. To help you get the most out of your cohabitation agreement, choose less stress by choosing Moore. Our Orlando family law attorneys can help with your case by:

  • Ensuring your interests are fully represented
  • Taking care of all the necessary paperwork
  • Drafting a legally-enforceable agreement on your behalf

And much more. Reach out to our lawyers today in Orlando, Florida, to get started. We offer a free initial consultation to review your situation.

What Is a Cohabitation Agreement?

A cohabitation agreement is a contract between two people who are living together but are not married. This agreement outlines the couple’s finances, property, and other important issues. 

The main reason to have a cohabitation agreement is to protect each person’s individual interests should the relationship end. Without this type of contract, each person would only be entitled to the property that is in their name, and because you’re not married, you’d have no legal interest in any property without your name. If the couple has been together for a long time and has built up joint assets, this could be unfair. 

A cohabitation agreement can also help to prevent arguments about money and property during the relationship. The agreement can spell out exactly who owns what and who is responsible for what bills. This can help to avoid fights about money and make it clear what each person’s responsibilities are. 

Why You Might Need One

While a cohabitation agreement might not seem romantic, it can save you a lot of headaches (and money) down the road. If you’re thinking about moving in with your partner or are already living together, here are three reasons to consider drafting a cohabitation agreement. 

1. You Want Clarity on Financial Responsibilities 

When you live with someone, it’s common to pool your resources and share expenses like rent, utilities, groceries, and more. But what happens if one person wants out of the relationship? Without an agreement in place, it’s difficult to determine who handles what expenses. A cohabitation agreement can lay out exactly who will pay for what so that there’s no confusion later on. 

2. You Have Children from a Previous Relationship 

If you have children from a previous relationship, you probably want to make sure that they are provided for financially, even if something happens to your current relationship. A cohabitation agreement can do just that by specifying how much financial support will be given to children and how assets will be passed on if one partner dies. 

3. You Want Peace of Mind 

At its core, a cohabitation agreement is about giving both partners peace of mind. It takes away the uncertainty of what would happen if the relationship ends and allows both people to go into the relationship with their eyes wide open. 

Cohabitation agreements aren’t just for couples who are planning on living together indefinitely; couples who are considering marriage can also use them when they want to iron out some financial details first (like whether one person will keep their own bank account). Ultimately, it’s up to each couple to decide whether a cohabitation agreement is right for them.  

Common Issues a Cohabitation Agreement Seeks to Resolve

A cohabitation agreement in Florida can include anything that the couple wants it to, with some limitations. However, there are some common topics that are usually included in these agreements. These topics include: 

  • Finances: This can include how bills will be paid, whether each person will have their own bank account, and what will happen to joint debts if the relationship ends. 
  • Property: This can include who owns what property, what will happen to joint property if the relationship ends, and how property will be divided if the couple decides to sell it. 
  • Child custody: If the couple has children together, they may want to include an agreement about child custody and visitation rights in the event of a breakup. 
  • Animals: The couple may want to include an agreement about who gets to keep any pets if they break up. 
  • Living arrangements: The couple may want to include an arrangement about who gets to stay in the home if they break up. 

Couples may also want to include other topics in their cohabitation agreement. These could be specific items that are important to them or items that they think might come up during their relationship. 

Items That Are Not Allowed in a Cohabitation Agreement 

There are some things that cannot be included in a cohabitation agreement in Florida. These things are illegal or against public policy. For example, a couple cannot agree to do any of the following things: 

  • Waive child support obligations 
  • Divide up retirement benefits in an unfair way 
  • Agree not to get married  

These are just a few examples of what cannot appear on an Orlando cohabitation agreement.

How To Enforce a Cohabitation Agreement

A cohabitation agreement can be a valuable tool for couples who want to protect their assets and interests without getting married. In Florida, because a cohabitation agreement is an enforceable contract, you could file a claim for breach of contract

If one party breaches the terms of the cohabitation agreement, the other party may file a claim for breach of contract. This type of claim seeks damages for any losses suffered as a result of the breach. Enforcing a cohabitation agreement can help couples protect their assets and interests without getting married. 

Schedule a Free Consultation With Our Orlando Cohabitation Agreement Lawyers

If you and your partner choose to not get married, you may still want to protect yourselves with a cohabitation agreement. Just make sure it’s set up correctly, so it’s valid and enforceable in Florida courts. To do that, partner with an experienced Orlando cohabitation agreement lawyer at Conti Moore Law Divorce Lawyers, PLLC.

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